A lavish wedding may increase your chances of divorce

Maybe a quiet wedding in the judge’s chambers is not such a bad idea after all. Or perhaps a small, intimate get-together with close friends or a no frills ceremony is the best way to go.

Splendid Insights, a research firm, conducted a survey and found that couples who spent in excess of 30,000 on their nuptials were more concerned about and focused on—impressing their guests than they were on the whole point of the vows themselves. Those who spent less than 10,000 had the goal of their union before that of throwing an elaborate event.

The economist took this information and did a feature story on the topic that uses a 2014 academic study of American marriages that found a direct link between a higher wedding cost and an increased rate of divorce. The pricier and more elaborate, the greater the chance it would not last. Yikes…

Wedding overall are a pricey event, a major cost for future brides/grooms and/or parents of the bride. The average cost of a wedding in 2017 was 26,000—a nice house deposit for those who are frugal. However wedding costs have decreased over the last decade by 6%–which is perhaps a reflection of the recession and high student loan debt. But with costs for rings, bachelor and Bachelorette parties, rehearsal dinners, and after wedding brunches—it’s a huge industry.

Then there is the cost of time and energy to plan the event and before and after parties. Wedding planners are used by less than a 5th of brides, but overall costs can still be staggering due to all the extras, options, and (heaven forbid) destination weddings. Those who opt to go all out suffer greater angst and stress—and this can take a toll on ALL their relationships, not just with their intended.

So if you are recently engaged and want to cut your chances of divorce, keep that guest list trimmed, resist all those extras—and focus on the whole point of your big day, one another and the life you are just starting together.